Peggie Arvidson

Life Coaching by Hand

Host the Coolest Palmistry Party Ever!

7 Tips for Hosting the Best Palmistry Party Ever

Why not invite a palmist to your next party?

I recently wrote about palmistry parties from a reader’s perspective, but what if you want to host the most fun palmistry party ever? Read on!

Getting together with friends is a highlight of my life. I’m particularly passionate about small, intimate gatherings where I can really lean in, look at my beautiful wise friends in the eyes and laugh out loud. Oh, and I love to mix it up a bit every once in a while and bring something new to the mix. Sometimes it’s making vision boards, sometimes we try making a fancy new recipe and other times we’ll hire a medium or psychic to come and speak to us and do some readings. If you’ve ever wanted to hire a reader to come hang out with you and your BFFs, here’s a quick guide to making it the most awesome event ever for everyone involved!

  1. Plan ahead. Depending on your reader they may need 3 months’ (or more) notice to put your event on their schedule. If you’re planning a weekend, you may need even more lead time. So make it easy on yourself and your friends and pick a couple of dates that have a good amount of lead time. Party planning is so much fun (and easy) when you have plenty of time to get everything together.
  2. Pick the right reader for the job. If you have someone you’ve been going to for years and you know her personality – that’s awesome! If that’s not the case though, where are you going to find your reader? Head out to the local metaphysical shop or fair and get a reading, or ask for recommendations! Still not sure? Do a search online and then ask for references! It’s also a good idea to gauge whether or not your reader has a personality that’s going to mesh with you and your peeps. Do you all have a raucous sense of humor? Then you want someone who isn’t going to be offended when you’re dropping the F-bomb or other NSFW asides. Are you more introspective? You’ll want someone who is great at bringing everyone to the party without feeling overwhelmed.
  3. Clarify the fees. Amazing but true – not every reader lists her fees publicly! Make sure you and your reader agree to fees, times and any other details ahead of time.Don’t be afraid to ask questions! Ask if your reader needs a particular set up, and/or time to prepare before you get started. Be specific about the number of guests expected and the time-frame you’d like your reader to fill. Many readers have a flat fee for a specific period of time, but some may charge by number of readings done, just ask. Your reader should have a contract or agreement that spells out these details. If they don’t, it won’t hurt to draw one up yourself. It should include things like cancellation policies, deposits, time of arrival and departure, additional fees for added time and even understandings about the reader’s role and meal. I’ve heard of readers coming in, eating all the appetizers and giving a half-hearted presentation before leaving. If you’re thinking you’ll get the Long Island Medium and what you get is the Pawdunk Psychic, no one is going to be happy.
  4. Let your reader know some basics about the crowd. Obviously if you’re hiring a psychic or medium you don’t want to give away personal details – it infringes on the integrity of the readings. However you do want to let your reader know if everyone is going to be in cut-off shorts and flip-flops or if they’re coming in their Sunday best. Most readers want to fit in with the theme of the evening. Of course if you’re hiring someone for t heir showmanship and wild wigs – that’s cool too – just give them the option to fit in.
  5. Corral your friends and let them know what you’re planning. Whether you’re paying the reader or you’re collecting payment from your friends, do yourself a favor and let them know up front what to expect. If you have a friend who, unbeknownst to you, is morally opposed to psychics, angel readers or the like, don’t put them in the position of feeling ostracized (or outraged) at your gathering. When it comes to money – be up front with your friends about this too. If it’s your treat – let it be a treat. If it’s not, then make it explicit. Some people get really hinky around money, so clear it up before the event happens so no one has their feelings hurt.
  6. Food and Drinks. Check with your reader. Some prefer you don’t drink, or eat during their readings as it can affect the energy in the room. Others recommend you all get down to your multi-margaritas after their gig is done so that you can focus on the information being shared. Ultimately, it’s your party, but your reader wants you and your friends to get the most out of their readings!
  7. Confirm the details. Make sure you confirm with your reader at least a week before your event. Let her know how many guests to expect, go over any specifics regarding set-up, directions and parking and any special needs you or your guests may have. Finalize your payment details if you haven’t and then sit back and prepare for a great time!

Now go – have a great party with your pals.

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Before You Become the Resident Palm Reader

11 Things You Should Know BEFORE You Become the Resident Palm Reader at your Local Metaphysical Shop

 

Before you commit to be the Resident Palmisty Pro, Answer these questions!

 

Hey ho Palmistry Pro! If you’ve done your homework and decided to start your own business (see my post on 14 Things You Should Know before starting your biz here) you may be itching to get a gig as the “resident reader” at your local metaphysical shop.

If you’re lucky enough to have a metaphysical shop in your area, being a resident reader can be a wonderful way to build a clientele, fine-tune your readings and even network with others in complementary professions. Every shop has its own vibe and quirks so it’s a good idea to do your homework before you settle in to the comfy back reading room. To make it easier for you to decide if the shop is a fit for you, here are 11 questions to answer before you commit.

  1. What’s the pay structure? It’s not awkward to have the money talk up front. The person who owns the shop is a business owner and you are a business owner too. Presumably you both want to deliver outstanding service to clients but if you don’t both want to make money, you’ll be back working for someone else in short order. The most common pay structure I’ve seen on the East Coast of the US include a 60/40 breakdown and a shop standard for reading rates. (you get the 60%, the shop gets 40%).
  2. What kind of insurance, if any, does the shop require? This is not a universal request but some shops will ask you to prove that you cover liability insurance that covers you in case an angry customer comes back blaming you and the shop for her bad financial investment or something similar. I’m not an insurance agent but we do have several recommendations about insurance coverage in the Profitable Palmist Private Group on Facebook.
  3. What special events will you be required to attend? Often shops have anniversary parties, holiday events and psychic fairs that are part of their marketing effort to build their customer base and show customer appreciation and they like their readers to be present. Find out before you sign on what those events are and if they conflict with any of your family traditions or trips.
  4. What’s the pay scale for special events? Many shops pay a lower fee for your readings at psychic fairs and events because they are charging special pricing for their customers. Usually your readings will be 10-15 minutes in length and you will be given a flat fee for the number of readings done at the event. Make sure this is a fit for you financially, especially if you’ll be missing out on New Year’s Eve with your honey to be there!
  5. How will they market your readings and what are you expected to do to bring in customers? Will you be writing a column for their website or newsletter? Does the shop do reader introductions to their loyal customers? What’s your responsibility for bringing people into the shop during your reading hours.
  6. Will you have a set schedule or by appointment only? Some shops want you to come in every third Tuesday regardless if they have bookings or not. Make sure you are cool with sitting in the shop when it’s slow and do your best to build up word of mouth to avoid feeling bored and underutilized! If you work by appointment only find out how far in advance they require appointments to be made and
  7. What’s their policy on no-shows? If the shop collects a deposit at the time an appointment is made, there is less likelihood of no-shows! If they have a deposit and the client doesn’t show, what percentage of the deposit do you get?
  8. Is the shop the kind of place your favorite type of clients would hang out? Spend some time looking around at the shop and getting to know their products and other services. Is what you see a match to your general way of working in the world? We all have a personal style or “vibe” and making sure that yours gels with the shop is an important factor.
  9. Do you feel like you want to tell the shop owner how to run his/her place? Sometimes you can tell that a shop has a ton of potential and your little helper heart just wants to jump in and assist in marketing, recommending products or other services. While it’s really nice of you to genuinely want to help, it’s important to remember that it’s not your shop. If you’re not asked, don’t meddle.
  10. Is this shop in a neighborhood or location that feels good to you and your perfect people? If you have to drive 40 miles each way to get to the shop, it may or may not be the best fit for you. Same goes if it’s in a strip mall surrounded by hamburger joints if you’re a vegetarian. Just make sure you and your perfect people find it worth your while to head out there!
  11. Is this shop going to be in business for the long haul? I know, you’re a palm-reader, not a psychic! Still, use your best judgment to decide if this shop owner is in the business for quick cash or to build a sustainable community mainstay.

Alright! Now you’re ready to decide whether or not being the resident reader at your local metaphysical shop is a perfect fit for you!

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The Profitable Palmist’s Guide

8 Guidelines for a Successful Palmistry Circle

 

Want to start booking palmistry parties to build your business? Here's how you can do it and still have a blast! PeggieArvidson.com

 

Over in The Profitable Palmist forum one topic that comes up often is how to conduct a successful private hand reading circle or palmistry party.

There are nearly as many ways to facilitate these events as there are palmists, and definitely make sure to infuse your event with your personality and style. However, the following are my best pieces advice for ensuring everyone has a great time (including you)!

  1. Get it in writing. Have a contract or other written agreement that is signed before you finalize a date. Your agreement should include the date and time of the event, the types of readings being given (see below), your fee and deposit and cancellation information.
  2. Define the work. Work with your host/hostess/meeting planner to be very specific on what types of readings will happen. If everyone at the event is getting a reading and you have a specific time frame for the event you’ll need to do the math to calculate how many guests can be read in that amount of time. Then make sure you have a timer on your phone or assign someone that role at the event so that you can stick to time and everyone gets a reading. Other reading options include having you in a separate room and people come to see you as they wish throughout the event, or you give a general talk and then take a few volunteers from the crowd for their own mini-readings within the group.  Obviously you  can vary this as you see fit, just be sure you and the party organizer are on the same page and include it in your agreement.
  3. A flat rate is easier for most organizers than a rate with tons of add-ons. Whether you say it’s a specific hourly rate and everything is included or you charge per number of attendees (let’s say one fee for 10-100 guests and another for 101-500) write it out and make it easy for you and for them to understand.
  4. I recommend arriving at least 30 minutes before the event begins so that you can go over any last minute details with the organizer and get an idea of the space where you’ll be working. Depending on the size of the gathering you can mingle as the party gets started and introduce yourself to different people. Some organizers may even want you to simply fit in to the event and read hands randomly as you see fit! If you arrive early, remember you are there to make the organizer’s job easier, don’t get in the way as they set up, but make yourself useful!
  5. For intimate gatherings it’s a great idea to include a short talk before you get started. This helps put all the attendees at ease as they hear from you what is and is not included in their reading. Some people are very nervous about having a palmist in their midst, as they are afraid we’re psychics and will release their deepest secrets to the entire group!
  6. Some hostesses/meeting planners do not want you to pitch during their event. Discuss this with the organizer before booking and include what you discussed in your working agreement. If you’re asked not to sell your private bookings during the event, ask if you can give out cards if you are directly asked for that information.
  7. If you want a large percentage of your palmistry business income to come from private events, be sure to follow up with the organizer after the event and ask if he or she know of any other people/meeting planners who might be interested in your service.
  8. Commit to having fun. As the hired entertainment at an event, bring your best self to the party and set the tone for your work. If you’re silly, be silly! If you’re more serious and studious be that way! Just be you and make sure you have a good time.

These are 8 simple guidelines for Palmistry Parties – share your tips or best practices in the comments!

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